Posts tagged " Virus "

Ethical hackers to boost NHS cyber-defences

November 28th, 2017 Posted by Uncategorized No Comment yet

The NHS is spending £20m to set up a security operations centre that will oversee the health service’s digital defences.

It will employ “ethical hackers” to look for weaknesses in health computer networks, not just react to breaches.

Such hackers use the same tactics seen in cyber-attacks to help organisations spot weak points.

In May, one-third of UK health trusts were hit by the WannaCry worm, which demanded cash to unlock infected PCs.

Essential step

In a statement, Dan Taylor, head of the data security centre at NHS Digital, said the centre would create and run a “near-real-time monitoring and alerting service that covers the whole health and care system”.

The centre would also help the NHS improve its “ability to anticipate future vulnerabilities while supporting health and care in remediating current known threats”, he said.

And operations centre guidance would complement the existing teams the NHS used to defend itself against cyber-threats.

NHS Digital, the IT arm of the health service, has issued an invitation to tender to find a partner to help run the project and advise it about the mix of expertise it required.

Kevin Beaumont, a security vulnerability manager, welcomed the plan to set up the centre.

“This is a really positive move,” he told the BBC.

Many private sector organisations already have similar central teams that use threat intelligence and analysis to keep networks secure.

“Having a function like this is essential in modern-day organisations,” Mr Beaumont said.

“In an event like WannaCry, the centre could help hospitals know where they are getting infected from in real time, which was a big issue at the time, organisations were unsure how they were being infected”.

In October, the UK’s National Audit Office said NHS trusts had been caught out by the WannaCry worm because they had failed to follow recommended cyber-security policies.

The NAO report said NHS trusts had not acted on critical alerts from NHS Digital or on warnings from 2014 that had urged users to patch or migrate away from vulnerable older software.

 

Thanks to the BBC for this story.

Google Docs users hit with sophisticated phishing attack in their inboxes

May 5th, 2017 Posted by Uncategorized No Comment yet

A Google Docs scam that appears to be widespread began landing in users’ inboxes on Wednesday in what seemed to be a sophisticated phishing or malware attack. The deceptive invitation to edit a Google Doc – the popular app used for writing and sharing files – appeared to be spreading rapidly, with a subject line stating a contact “has shared a document on Google Docs with you”. If users click the “Open in Docs” button in the email, it takes them to a legitimate Google sign-in screen that asks to “continue in Google Docs”.

Clicking on that link grants permission to a bogus third-party app to possibly access contacts and email, which could allow the spam to spread to additional contacts.

Google has said it is aware of the issue and investigating it. The company encouraged users to report the email as phishing within Gmail.

“We have taken action to protect users against an email impersonating Google Docs, and have disabled offending accounts,” a spokesperson said in a statement. “We’ve removed the fake pages, pushed updates through Safe Browsing, and our abuse team is working to prevent this kind of spoofing from happening again.”

The company did not immediately respond to requests for comment on how many people had been affected by the attack and where it may have originated.

Web

Phishing scams typically involve emails, ads or websites that appear to be real and ask for personal information, such as usernames, passwords, social security numbers, bank account data or birthdays. Google says it does not send out emails asking for this type of data and encourages users not to click on any links and to report suspicious messages.

As the Verge noted, Wednesday’s attack seemed to be more advanced than standard email phishing scams, because it doesn’t simply take users to a bogus Google page to collect a password, but instead is working within Google’s system with a third-party web app that has a deceptive name.

If users have already granted permission through the phishing email, they can go to their settings and revoke the app.